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RoyT
Tech Addict
From: United States
Posts: 1218
This has been discussed in a couple of other threads, but deserves it's own. Compares to $300 makibox HT but bigger print volume of 254mm x 254mm x 254mm. Price quote for kit. But assembled also available for extra cost. Rigidbot Big model has even more print volume for extra cost. I am not sure on print quality, calibration or ongoing maintenance compared to makibox.

http://www.inventapart.com/rigidbot.php

I'm not sure how definite that ship date really is. Also unknown is how critical is the z axis upgrade. If vital, that adds $50 to the price.
2021-09-30 05:26
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jlogajan
Posts: 96
Near as I can make out, that shipping date is for new buyers. The backers were supposed to start seeing their units any time now. It's likely both dates will slip at this point.

I bought the Makibox and then a couple days later stumbled onto the Rigidbot, so I also bought the Big. The "Big" is big. It is sort of an issue where you are going to put it, which I haven't figured out yet.

On a limited budget one would have to pick one or the other. I am suspecting that the Makibox will be more precise, so thus better for the smaller parts it can build. On the other hand, if you need big parts ...

I have to say that if I saw the Rigidbot first, I probably wouldn't have bought the Makibox even if it was already shipping -- just because I couldn't justify a unit that couldn't do more than the one I already purchased. As it is, that consideration is asymmetrical -- the Rigidbot can do more (bigger) than Makibox. Which is why I could justify the second purchase.

So if the Makibox is better at small parts (anything in it's build volume) I'll run on that. The Rididbot will then be for bigger parts or a dual builds.
2021-09-30 06:21
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jlogajan
Posts: 96
In regards to the Z axis, I don't know what the difference is with their upgrade option, but model strength-wise, Z precisioin is important. I've heard it is better to error on the side of being too close on Z layer rather than to far. If you have a lot of Z variation, you'll probably get a weak part that can separate along the layers.
2021-09-30 06:26
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Tcrunk
Posts: 45
I wouldn't say the makibox is more precise at printing smaller. Look at the test prints that the rigidbot printed(these prints are not with the injected molded brackets) and its in pla(http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1650950769/rigidbot-3d-printer). The nozzle sizes are the same. From what I know the rigid bot should be able to print faster then the maki box cause of the belts for the x and y. From what I have learned as well correct me if I'm wrong belts print more accurate then just plane ol threaded rods for the x and y axis. Bottom line if a small footprint for a printer is what you need maki box is for you. If you don't care how big the printer is and the weight is. I think rigid bot is the way to go. Just 1 more thing to throw in about the rigid bot is its gonna have a switch built in for a dual extrudered up grade built in at ship.
2021-09-30 07:26
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Jon Buford (jonbuford)
Lead Developer
From: Hong Kong
Posts: 614
The downside of the belts vs. the lead screws is that you will need to recalibrate them periodically to keep your precision. The MakiBox is using 8mm pitch lead screws, so hits up to 65mm/s for fast moves. Again, different design goals and very different machines.
2021-09-30 10:03
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RoyT
Tech Addict
From: United States
Posts: 1218
See this thread for discuss of screw vs belt
http://makibox.com/forum/topic/1403
2021-09-30 11:05
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slatye
Posts: 282
I'd love to have a 10" build space - but if I got a Rigidbot then it'd have to live in the garage because there's no space inside. This would ensure that it virtually never got used.

The Makibox will fit on a corner of my desk. As a result, I might actually use it. That seems like a better option to me.

Apart from that, I find that there aren't many really big parts that I (a) need to print and (b) can print on any cheap 3D printer. Bigger parts cost more, take longer, and are less likely to actually work (more opportunity for the print to fail). The bigger a part gets, the more likely it is to have interesting features like overhangs that don't come out too well. As a result of this, I tend to look at alternative manufacturing options - maybe small parts joined by off-the-shelf materials like carbon fibre rods or plywood sheets.

Perhaps in the future that'll change. If we end up with stereolithographic printers that can do a big, complex part in half an hour for $5 then I'll probably go for one with a decent build space. At the moment, however, the Makibox seems like a more useful size.
2021-09-30 17:03
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RoyT
Tech Addict
From: United States
Posts: 1218
I'm no structure engineer, but the more I look at that frame, I wonder how stable it will be with vibration/wobble. Also no detail on how well it distributes heat over that humongous bed. Aluminum? But he has printed a lot so I guess it's working.

Hmmm, that bed is also moved a lot in either x or y throughout each layer printed. A lot of mass to throw around precisely.
2021-10-01 01:20
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Kristian Blåsol (Sourcery)
From: Vittsjoe, Sweden
Posts: 190
RoyT: I read on their website that you CAN print with both PLA and ABS but they recommended PLA, since ABS warped, and then they even had a picture showing it... So probably not a "good" hotbed...

Edit: Cant find the page, but here is the picture at least... the ABS is the one in the middle... The warped one :)
http://inventapart.com/images/rigidbot/owl.jpg
Makibox HT ordered,
Sourcery Studios - Boundless Creativity
http://www.sourcerystudios.se
2021-10-01 14:30
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NarimaanV
Posts: 338
iconSourcery:
So probably not a "good" hotbed...


And also adding onto that, if you look at the comparison page for the regular and the big models here, http://inventapart.com/rigidbot_tech_info.php, both the power requirements and power supplies are identical. So correct me if I'm wrong, but shouldn't the bigger hotbed need a bigger power supply? Maybe implies the same sized heater is used for both the smaller AND the bigger beds? If that's true, then the hotbed on the big really doesn't do much good for those bigger builds... :huh:
Given Up on Waiting, Don't Care if it Comes Anymore :thumbdown:
2021-10-01 14:42
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Jon Buford (jonbuford)
Lead Developer
From: Hong Kong
Posts: 614
Yep, power requirements roughly scale with the area you are heating. Although, it depends on how efficient your heating is.
2021-10-01 15:03
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jlogajan
Posts: 96
iconSourcery:
they recommended PLA, since ABS warped

As I understand it (I could be wrong) the heated build plate was a stretch goal if they received like a million dollars in pledges. Therefore the original video etc assumed a non-heated build plate, hence the PLA recommendation. They did reach their funding stretch goal and added the heated plate after the fact.
2021-10-01 15:11
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jlogajan
Posts: 96
iconNarimaanV:
Maybe implies the same sized heater is used for both the smaller AND the bigger beds?

One of their early claims was that size was configurable. I think that means that some components are oversized for the smaller unit. They also have hooks in the hardware for a second extruder.
2021-10-01 15:16
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Jon Buford (jonbuford)
Lead Developer
From: Hong Kong
Posts: 614
The firmwares that everyone uses generally can support multiple extruders. We've got a setup that uses two driver boards which could technically do up to five extruders, not that the A6 would be able to support that.
2021-10-01 16:03
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RoyT
Tech Addict
From: United States
Posts: 1218
In kickstarter update, says they use 400 watt power supply. Again, no distinction between standard and big model. Makibox HT has 120 watt.

Also, September shipments to kickstarters now delayed (typical for all projects). He's at the point where he's reviewing samples from injection mold. Sound familiar?

Oh, Sept is for kickstarter backers, the Dec date in this thread title is for non-kickstarter orders.
2021-10-02 00:29
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