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Cris Rowlands (CrisRowlands)
Designer
From: Cradley Heath, United Kingdom
Posts: 121
Yup, made things a lot better. Also just brushed some onto the X & Y axis threads.

Now that I've got her printing, I'm running into more common problems which I need to get around.

First off, wobbliness.
I know there is a print available to reduce wobble from the Z axis -> http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:330307
I printed that a good while back, one of about 5 prints which completed pre-E3DV6.
I'm gonna attach that once I've found a suitable L-bracket.

The second problem is first layer adhesion.
I've had prints coming unstuck from the print bed before they're complete, I have a print running at this very moment which is curling up at all four corners (its a flat square kinda print) and I've had the outer ring on the first layer of EVERY completed print fall off.

In response to the adhesion problem I plan on:
A ) cleaning the print bed (which I've not done since getting Susan).
B ) running a glue stick over the print, see how it goes.
C ) spraying some hair spray over the print bed, see how it goes.

I want to make an injection mould tool.
I work as a draughtsman at Neoperl UK where we injection mould flow regulators. I have no intention of making a full size, fully working mould, that would just be silly. I've modelled up a simplified, miniature version of one of our standard tools & plan on printing it to have on my desk as a fun 3D Printed sample & useful to teach newbies the basics of our moulds. Main problem is, just like the real thing, it involves various parts lining up for it to work. Need to fix this wobbling first.
It's not about being growing up,
it's about being strategically childish.
2021-06-12 02:57
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jbarnhardt
From: Seattle, United States
Posts: 191
Chris, definitely try cleaning your bed well (use acetone) and making sure your first layer is laying down really well on the bed before resorting to glue stick or hairspray. I always had fantastic adhesion to my Makibox steel bed, assuming it was clean (I did a quick acetone wipe before every print), the z-zero height was well calibrated, and my bed temp was correct. Quite literally never had a print pop off the bed before completion (I did of course have corner lifting of ABS on some parts due to cooling, but that is largely unavoidable and best cured with modifications to the part you're printing). Using glue stick or especially hairspray on the non-removable Makibox bed will cause a real mess over time (not just on the bed in the case of hairspray) and be difficult to clean well. If you do end up going this route, you will probably want to add a sheet of glass to your bed as a number of other people have done so that you can apply the glue/hairspray/whatever outside the Makibox and easily remove the bed surface it for cleaning. Glad your printing is working generally well, nice work!

-John
2021-06-12 04:36
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Cris Rowlands (CrisRowlands)
Designer
From: Cradley Heath, United Kingdom
Posts: 121
Problem is I have a TL, so no heated print bed, otherwise this would all be a lot easier :(
It's not about being growing up,
it's about being strategically childish.
2021-06-12 04:46
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jbarnhardt
From: Seattle, United States
Posts: 191
Ah right, my apologies. I'd forgotten that. Sounds like you have a good sequence of things to try. Best of luck my friend.

-John
2021-06-12 05:22
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rhercher
Posts: 345
Hey Chris, I know it's a shot in the dark, especially since CS hasn't responded to anyone in ages, but maybe email CS/Tweet Makible or Jon and ask if you can get an upgrade to the heated bed?
2021-06-12 14:26
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curious_aardvark
Posts: 262
an alternative is to slice with cura and use a raft. gives a flat layer around the print so that the print it self shouldn't peel.

Someone also mentioned a setting that put flat pads under each corner of the print. Think that option was in repetier host.

Also try some of the tapes on glass. Don't do what I've done and buy a 15cm wide roll.
It's almost impossible to deal with kapton tape that wide. So far I haven't managed to get a satisfactorily bubble free covering on glass.
A narrower roll would definitely be easier to handle.

This stuff is incredibly thin and seriously sticky. Just peeling it from the roll is tricky - we live and learn :-)
2021-06-13 18:26
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RFZ
From: Muenchen, Germany
Posts: 113
iconcurious_aardvark:
Don't do what I've done and buy a 15cm wide roll.
It's almost impossible to deal with kapton tape that wide. So far I haven't managed to get a satisfactorily bubble free covering on glass.

Use soap water applied to the glass, then you can easly align the tape and squish all the bubbles out.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6y8St1q2LM
2021-06-13 18:34
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bitpharked
Posts: 39
iconcurious_aardvark:
an alternative is to slice with cura and use a raft. gives a flat layer around the print so that the print it self shouldn't peel.

Someone also mentioned a setting that put flat pads under each corner of the print. Think that option was in repetier host.

Also try some of the tapes on glass. Don't do what I've done and buy a 15cm wide roll.
It's almost impossible to deal with kapton tape that wide. So far I haven't managed to get a satisfactorily bubble free covering on glass.
A narrower roll would definitely be easier to handle.

This stuff is incredibly thin and seriously sticky. Just peeling it from the roll is tricky - we live and learn :-)


They are called helper disks, you can draw your own or download from yeggi or thingiverse i think. Add them in in Slic3er and place them into the corners of your project then convert to g-code. I found that these printers (because they are a closed unit), are exposed to surrounding tempature. Because it is currently winter here, and I am printing at night...I turn on the heater in my office and warm it up. I found this made a huge difference to the corners not curling up and the first few layers stopping them from cooling down too quick. The next 3D Printer I am designing will be enclosed , to contain the heat in the printer to reduce fast shrinkage of the bottom layers. I have seen some on the net that have made enclosures that they place the printer into (especially in air conditioned offices)

I also bumped up the thickiness of the layer to 260% from 200%. I found thatl the combination this and changing the room tempeture gave me instant great results at .1 and .2mm layers. Anything higher than 260-270% in width would leave a little excess leakage across the inside of the print went it moved to another postion.
2021-06-13 22:03
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Cris Rowlands (CrisRowlands)
Designer
From: Cradley Heath, United Kingdom
Posts: 121
I've spent yesterday & today away doing some training for work (a course teaching me everything about SolidWorks Plastics if you wanna know, with SolidSolutions UK) and whilst bored, lying in a hotel I had a think about my issues with Susan.

I remembered that I've noticed the whole E3D assembly rotating. It moves around the print area as the cables pull it when they flex. This was also causing the three chopped up bits of business cards to rotate & come loose.

After returning from leamington spa (via what felt like a train tour of the entirety of the uk) I took the business card pieces out, cut some new ones to replace them & tightly put them back. I'm currently running a print & whilst the cards are still rotating, the print is appearing less wobbly. Even with a bit of wobble, I plan on printing a new mount for my E3D which should hold it properly.

That being said, there does seem to be a bit of play on the y-axis (the faces facing the front & rear of the MakiBox) which I guess is due to z-axis wobble, moving the bed as it goes down. As I said before, I need to find a suitable L-bracket before I can add the z-wobble fix.

Also, the print that's currently running is my first test of covering the print bed using a simple glue stick to combat warped edges/corners. So far it looks good, but I'll wait until the end of the print to draw my conclusions on that. It might also help that this room is generally really rather warm.

Finally, I want to ask if anyone has much experience of running prints off the MicroSD card & how to go about that?
Bought a 1GB card for a couple quid to try out.
It's not about being growing up,
it's about being strategically childish.
2021-06-14 04:32
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Cris Rowlands (CrisRowlands)
Designer
From: Cradley Heath, United Kingdom
Posts: 121
The E3D mount is made up of two parts, which go above & below the X & Y axis arms.
In each corner of the mount there are holes which are for screwing the two halves together.

Whilst looking at it, I realised that if I simply put a long screw through one of them, it would stop the fan from turning any further round. If it goes too far, it gets in the way of homing & results in motors making horrible noises which I'd rather avoid. As soon as this print finishes (another 40 mins of this 2 hour print remaining >_< - never realised quite how long things take to print) I plan on adding that long screw in.

Once that's done, I only need to worry about those bits of card & the Z-Wobble :)
It's not about being growing up,
it's about being strategically childish.
2021-06-14 05:10
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RoyT
Tech Addict
From: United States
Posts: 1226
SD card printing, autoprint is the simple way https://bitbucket.org/makible/5dprint-firmware/wiki/Auto%20print%20from%20micro%20SD%20Card

Requires firmware 2.20.22 or later.

On your computer, create your Gcode file, name it autoprint.gcode, copy to the SD card, pop it out.

On the printer, pop in the SD card.

Not sure, but maybe safe to first unplug USB cable from the computer and power off than on the printer to reset it. It's not clear, but I think you can insert the card into the printer while the printer is powered on.

If you have the older green printrboard, the y endstop connector must be plugged into the e Endstop plug on the board.
https://bitbucket.org/makible/5dprint-firmware/wiki/Home
2021-06-14 05:52
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Cris Rowlands (CrisRowlands)
Designer
From: Cradley Heath, United Kingdom
Posts: 121
:D Awesome. I'll try it out sometime. Just like the idea of printing sans laptop at some point once I've got her printing right every time.

Sadly the print I was running just failed; the filament jammed.

I think it was possibly a combination of todays irritatingly warm weather & having run for 2 hours already, but the e-step motor (FroZen drive motor) has got so incredibly hot that it hurts to touch it any longer than a second.



Think I may need to play with the motor voltage, but I've done that once already. I think either I just did it wrong last time or I need to change the value or something. I don't really know.

On the plus side, I was commenting on twitter earlier (http://www.twitter.com/CrisRowlands) how nice it is to sometimes look down on a print like this & see the internal lattice/support aligning perfectly. I felt a little sad that I couldn't just stop it mid print so I could keep it as a sample to show what the inside of a print looks like. Looks like I got my wish.



On the plus side, the glue stick worked :D
It's not about being growing up,
it's about being strategically childish.
2021-06-14 06:07
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sethmo38@gmail.com
From: Keokuk, United States
Posts: 84
I just started using a 4x6 plate of glass(2x clamps on the front, one clamp on the back right side), blue painters tape, and purple washable Elmers glue, and this did amazing things for my ABS warpage.

I have done two prints with this setup(both e3d v6 mounts), and they both have minimal warpage.

What part is the blue square you printed for?
2021-06-14 09:38
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Cris Rowlands (CrisRowlands)
Designer
From: Cradley Heath, United Kingdom
Posts: 121
That part is the first of several plates of a miniature model of one of the injection moulding moulds from work :P

Just printed a little clip which doesn't look to dissimilar to a ring-pull of a can & screwed it onto one corner of the E3D mount (using the long screws I mentioned earlier which now hold the fan in one place very nicely) and now it's holding all the cables in one place :D

Whilst the long screws are stopping the fan from rotating, the cable tidy is stopping the cables from moving as much, meaning the hot end itself is moving less. Overall it's a win. PLUS the long screws are even keeping the pieces of business card in place.

I've turned down the voltage to all the motors & it's still running. It's not been printing for ages yet, but the e-step motor seems alright so far temperature wise. Now I need to sort that Z-Wobble & it's all good.
It's not about being growing up,
it's about being strategically childish.
2021-06-14 18:18
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curious_aardvark
Posts: 262
iconRFZ:
iconcurious_aardvark:
Don't do what I've done and buy a 15cm wide roll.
It's almost impossible to deal with kapton tape that wide. So far I haven't managed to get a satisfactorily bubble free covering on glass.

Use soap water applied to the glass, then you can easly align the tape and squish all the bubbles out.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6y8St1q2LM


yeah, been there, done that - and no you bloody can't - not with a 15 cm strip. The stuff's just too thin, too sticky and too bloody hard to peel off a 15 cm roll without stretching. My next move is probably going to be cutting the 15 cm roll into a 10 and a 5 cm roll on my bandsaw.
Might work - can't be worse than it is at the moment :-)

Might gum the works and break the bandsaw blade - you never know until you try :lol:

iconQuote:
I felt a little sad that I couldn't just stop it mid print so I could keep it as a sample to show what the inside of a print looks like.


Sure you can - all the control softwares have stop print buttons, there's even a thread somewhere warning about the emergency stop button on repetier host and how to avoid pressing it midprint.

Cura has a pause button, not looked at any others. But they'd all have a pause or stop button.
Cura even ha s apause at a specific layer height to allow for changing filaments.
2021-06-14 19:11