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jbarnhardt
From: Seattle, United States
Posts: 191
iconCrisRowlands:
A question for anyone who's received a replacement hot end:
What exactly do they send you?

Do they include the plastic parts for attaching to the x&y axis?
How about the screws holding that assembly together?
Or is it the entire hot end assembly?


It's the entire assembly - you get the exact little box that the original hot end assembly came in, which includes the hot end itself, the mounting blocks and the screws. Just as it came in the original kit.

-John
2021-04-24 11:49
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Cris Rowlands (CrisRowlands)
Designer
From: Cradley Heath, United Kingdom
Posts: 121
Thanks jbarnhardt, you're exactly right.

After a non delivery due to customs charges, a missed delivery due to being at work & a long walk through the pouring rain, I've finally got my two new hot ends :D :D :D :D :D :D

So far I've only actually opened one, keeping the other safely packed away 'just in case',
I fitted it into Susan, spent aaaaages levelling the bed, fed in some filament & did (yet another) test cube.

Everything was looking fine until about the 70th layer, when every layer was slightly offset from the previous in both x & y directions :/ Still no idea what caused that. Up until that point it had been the most promising print I'd made.

I then tested with a few other colours & ended up getting filament jams in the zen drive (despite replacing the zen wheel at the same time as the hot end). This was a little disappointing as you might expect. I kinda hoped that by replacing the hot end & zen wheel, everything might just magically start working.

My last attempt last night was to turn the hot end up to 240 degrees, the hottest I've made any hot end go, in hope that it would ease pressure on the filament. The print came out beautifully with surprisingly straight lines & angled ..erm.. angles, but it too jammed up about halfway through.


I've replaced parts, but so far I've not modded anything.
I don't have access to another 3D printer, but I do have access to a full metal work shop.
I'm open to suggestions of what to try next.
It's not about being growing up,
it's about being strategically childish.
2021-04-24 15:08
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robthebrew
Posts: 763
get a FroZen.
2021-04-24 17:36
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Cris Rowlands (CrisRowlands)
Designer
From: Cradley Heath, United Kingdom
Posts: 121
I figured someone would say that :P
Problem is I can't print one myself.
I might have to modify it a little & make it in the workshop at work.
It's not about being growing up,
it's about being strategically childish.
2021-04-24 19:20
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robthebrew
Posts: 763
Chris, send me your address (to my user name at gmail.com) and I'll print one for you. It might need a bit of filing after as my extrusion multiplier is not dialled in 100% on the black filament I am now using.
2021-04-24 19:36
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Cris Rowlands (CrisRowlands)
Designer
From: Cradley Heath, United Kingdom
Posts: 121
Thanks Rob :D
It's not about being growing up,
it's about being strategically childish.
2021-04-24 20:38
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Cris Rowlands (CrisRowlands)
Designer
From: Cradley Heath, United Kingdom
Posts: 121
The parts of a FroZen extruder robthebrew made for me turned up today :D
Despite not having the back plate & the right length screws to hand, I worked at it a bit with a dremel.
I also found a single screw that was just about long enough, so its in place, but not properly secured.

That being said, its secured well enough to extrude filament, but not quite well enough to push it through the hot end yet.
I plan on making the back plate & getting my hands on some more appropriate screws during the week, then I'll give it another go :)

Exciting times ahead!
It's not about being growing up,
it's about being strategically childish.
2021-04-26 02:00
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jbarnhardt
From: Seattle, United States
Posts: 191
FYI the FroZen backplate is 2.5mm thick. You could cut one with saw out of plastic or plywood or anything else that was approximately the right thickness. Or shorten your screws (file, clippers, ???) a little such that the backplate isn't necessary. Its primary function is to make the 25mm bolts engage the right distance into the stepper such that they don't "bottom out" and hit the bolts from the back side of the stepper that are in the same holes and hold the body of the stepper together.

-John
2021-04-26 02:12
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Cris Rowlands (CrisRowlands)
Designer
From: Cradley Heath, United Kingdom
Posts: 121
I assembled it without the back plate.
I used a single 20/25mm (didn't measure it) screw to hold the stepper motor & frozen assembly together.
Then a further two screws that usually hold the zen assembly together, just to keep things aligned.
It's not about being growing up,
it's about being strategically childish.
2021-04-26 03:46
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robthebrew
Posts: 763
get proper length screws. You will avoid pain.
2021-04-26 04:48
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jbarnhardt
From: Seattle, United States
Posts: 191
Agreed. Your chances of success go down significantly if it's not properly mounted. It will be hard to get reliable control of the relationship between the bearing and the gear (which in turn controls tension on the filament) unless it is firmly mounted.

-John
2021-04-26 06:43
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James K. Rivera (SirGeekALot)
From: Bellevue, United States
Posts: 97
iconrhercher:
Dumb question: when Hong Kong was a British colony prior to 1997, did the UK collect import charges then?


Interesting question that I do not really know the current answer to, but it seems they did not prior to the 1950s:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Hong_Kong#Modern_Hong_Kong_under_British_rule_.281950s_.E2.80.93_1997.29

Basically, the key point seems to be entrepôt trade (essentially a duty free trade zone), which was apparently discontinued sometime in the 1950s (no explicit date was given)::
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrep%C3%B4t
2021-04-30 01:23
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Cris Rowlands (CrisRowlands)
Designer
From: Cradley Heath, United Kingdom
Posts: 121
The guys at work were being a bit slow at making the backplate for my FroZen extruder, so after a week of not using her, I'd try Susan again. This time I'd try slicing my own files, rather than using the example test files.

I've just successfully completed my first proper full print - the backplate.

Printed using Makible's own yellow filament, as that's the filament I appeared to have had most success with before.
Gonna leave it a while before I try & get it off the printbed as it seems pretty well stuck at the moment.

Was waiting for the backplate before I had to make the journey to find the screws.
Looks like I know what my challenge for this week is.
It's not about being growing up,
it's about being strategically childish.
2021-05-06 02:10
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jbarnhardt
From: Seattle, United States
Posts: 191
Congrats! And a useful/functional first full print at that. Nice job sticking with it. Hope to see pics of more prints in the near future.

-John
2021-05-06 03:19
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robthebrew
Posts: 763
Nice one Cris!
2021-05-06 04:10